*RE-Defined: Thanksgiving

Saying, “thank you” after someone handed me a gift used to be my ultimate expression of gratitude. That’s how I was raised. Once I had a family of my own, my husband and I encouraged similar behavior for our own daughters. Make sure you say thank you we’d sing in unison. I thought it was a common cultural practice. As a result, I began to reprimand others for not making their children thank me for birthday or holiday presents. Things had gotten out of hand. Don’t get me wrong. There is significance in thanking a person when he or she hands you something. In fact, I still believe it’s a gracious response. But somehow my concept of gratitude was limited to just this act.

I needed a gratitude overhaul.

After careful soul searching, I figured out the problem. I was seeking gratitude when I should have been living in a spirit of gratitude. But how? How does one achieve this? I decided that one way was to send fewer material items and provide more authentic expressions of appreciation to people who had impacted my life. I decided to be gratitude.

The process was simple.

I chose a month and then told one person each day how grateful I was for him or her being in my life. Loved ones felt compelled to return the favor. As a result, it became a sort of gratitude exchange. My intention was to make them feel valued. But they also wanted me to feel equally loved. This even and immediate trade happened with all of the people that I contacted, except my goddaughter, Kotrish.

When I told Kotrish that I was grateful for her presence, this young lady’s response was, “Thanks. That was unexpected.” My old self wanted to judge the reply. But I remembered the purpose was to appreciate others, no matter the reaction. I accepted it and continued on.

So, the month of gratitude ended. Christmas had come and gone. A new year had begun.

The memory is still clear. I had just returned home from work. Waiting on the dining room table was a salmon-colored envelope addressed to me. Inside was a matching salmon-colored thank you card. Kotrish had handwritten a note filled with ten separate thank-you statements. I cried. It meant so much to me that I carried it in my inside purse pocket for weeks. The blurred blue ink shows how much I’ve held it. Its tattered edges reveal how much I have opened it. I thought this would be the only card.

But I was wrong.

Her testimonials continued. For the next year, she sent four more handwritten thank-you cards every other month. Each one is different. Each one is heartfelt. Each one is better than any other gift I could ever receive from her.

I know it is customary to exchange store-bought presents during this time of year. But perhaps you can gift your loved ones with an additional item. Maybe this holiday season, you can offer an expression of gratitude. Jewelry will fade and clothes will soon be outdated. Telling others how much you value them? Well, that could last an entire lifetime.

*This was originally published in Natural Awakenings November 2015.

Guest Post by KE Garland: “30 Days of Gratitude”

Check out my quest post on http://theacademyofgratitude.com/2015/05/08/guest-post-by-ke-garland-30-days-of-gratitude/ and also check out her blog, in general! It’s full of positive living through gratitude.

The Academy of Gratitude

I’m so excited to have my first guest blogger today! So fun to share my platform with other super cool, like-minded people who have uncovered the magic behind gratitude. 

Screen Shot 2015-05-07 at 5.17.22 PMK E Garland is a native to Chicago, IL, but has lived in Jacksonville, Florida for the past 20 years. Her e-book, Kwoted, includes over 100 original, motivational quotes that can be purchased through Amazon. Follow her on Twitter @kwotedkegarland and on her blog at kwoted.wordpress.com.

30 DAYS OF

Don’t leave it to chance that someone knows you’re grateful.
Kwote #50

Last year for my husband’s birthday, I decided to celebrate him in a different way.

I was determined to do some thing that he would remember for years to come. I mentally noted all of the positive things I liked about him. Because his birthday was seven days away, it was the perfect time to begin what I named The Seven Days of DG…

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