Monday Notes: The Relationship I Have with My Body

“When is the last time you felt good about your body?” the naturopath asked me.

I thought about it for a few seconds, then I said, “I think I’m going to cry.”

“That’s okay,” she and my husband affirmed.

I knew it was okay to cry. But I was taken off guard by own emotions. When I really stopped to think about it, I didn’t know.

It wasn’t in the past year, when out of the blue, I developed a rash that took up my entire forearm. It’s healed now, but it looks like a faint trail of bacteria.

Last year is also when perimenopause seemed to have ramped up and took a hold of my physical being. It’s also when I decided to get a crown on my front tooth, instead of a cap. Since December, I’ve worried everyday about my crown falling off when I eat or when I sleep and grind my teeth, leaving a gaping hole in my mouth.

So, no. I didn’t feel good about my body last year.

What about ten years ago? Nope. That’s when I started gaining a pound a year, even though I worked out four times a week and ate mostly healthy foods. My primary care physician didn’t seem too worried about it, so I figured I didn’t need to be either. Still, I didn’t feel good about my body. I felt fat.

What about twenty years ago? Definitely not. That’s when I had to deliver my second child as a C-section. I wrote about this experience recently, but I want to reiterate that there’s no way anyone can prepare you for your body being sliced open and sewed back together in what seems to be a lackadaisical way.

What about twenty-six years ago? Almost. I almost thought I was okay. It was a year before my wedding. I was talking to my grandmother, and she mentioned that I was fat.

“You’re supposed to wait until you’re married and have kids before you get fat,” were her exact words.

I was 125 pounds.

The next week, I began eating 1200 calorie meals and doing aerobics five times a week. By the time I stood at the altar, I was 100 pounds and a size one, something I’ve never been in my life before or after that date.

What about thirty years ago? YES! The last time I felt good about my body was thirty flipping years ago when I was an eighteen-year-old high school senior. I was petite. I was cute. Curves were curving in all the right spaces. Skin was tight and bright. All of the things were where they were supposed to be.


It’s amazing what can be revealed by just one question.

I’ve never thought of myself as having issues with body image, not really. But as I sit here and reflect on how long it took me to come up with a real answer (30 minutes) and what it took for me to figure out an answer (blog), I admit I have. If I didn’t, I would’ve been able to answer that question much quicker or at least three weeks ago, while I was actually at the doctor’s office.

So, today, I have questions, instead of answers:

  • When is the last time you felt good about your body?
  • If you already feel good about your body, how do you maintain that feeling?

Until then, I’ll be offline, staring in the mirror, saying some affirmations or something.

137 thoughts on “Monday Notes: The Relationship I Have with My Body

  1. This post has got me thinking far. For a greater part of my life, I’ve never liked my body. I started liking myself some fours years back after I lost a lot of weight. I was a victim of bullying in high school, it was very bad.

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    1. I’m sorry to hear you were bullied, and I’m sure that must’ve impacted how you feel about yourself. Even though I’m happy to hear you’ve lost a lot of weight, I do hope you know…deep down, that you shouldn’t attach it to how you feel about yourself 😉 Sending you some light, love, and a virtual hug ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow! I feel like I have a decent self-esteem, but when it comes to my body…I gave birth at age 19, and my body was never the same. I’m 51. So yep, over 30 years ago. I suppose along the way I decided my body was the least of my concerns.

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    1. I was gonna say one day it’ll be the least of my concerns, but I don’t think that’s true. I want to expand this to be more than body image, per se, you know? Like even without the fat comments, right now I feel like my body has betrayed me on some level (although I know that’s not true lol).

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  3. And btw, I almost feel a little disingenuous answering your question in my half joking way, for when it comes to self acceptances, the western differences between men and women and even those who identify gender neutral, really seem like they might diverge in so many ways. I did enjoy other readers’ responses to your question and peoples honesty has my fullest respect.

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  4. When I clicked on the link about the rash it took me to a page where the first thing I saw was a pair of butt cheeks and I thought “Oh no K., tell me you didn’t!!!!” and then I saw it was a very clinically-oriented third party medical site for information purposes, hahahaha. I’ve never checked a lot of boxes for handsomeness or the perfect bod. My grandma and mom always told me I was goodlooking but that was just a lie, that’s what they’re suppose to say. when was the last time I really felt good about my body? that would be before the pandemic, when I had my usual full beard. Having a thick, lush beard makes me feel mysterious and that for all anyone knows I could be a real looker hiding under all that hair and my piercing blue eyes tend to distract from the reality. But I’ve been operating in the open all this time (easier for when I have to wear a mask) and I don’t like it, at all. My answer is kind of cheating, I guess. There are different categories for the body. So I’ll just go with that. In all seriousness, for some of us, accepting ourselves is a very lifelong process. I fit solidly into that category. Now that things are starting to fall apart or break here and there, I’m less concerned about the body and more what’s under the hood

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    1. You are so silly lol Is that what it was???

      That last part is EXACTLY what I just mentioned to someone else. It’s not necessarily just about body image/positivity. It’s also about how our bodies are functioning, especially during midlife.

      Thanks for this comment, Jason!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Thought-provoking questions!
    I think I feel neutral to somewhat good about my body. I don’t think of it as being physically attractive, but I can go out without makeup and be ok with that (makeup is a marginal not massive improvement anyway), I can find clothes that I like and that fit, I’ve gotten naked in semi-public in a country with more of a public bathing culture and I didn’t feel like I was going to die of humiliation, etc.
    Mostly, I’m overall grateful for my body. My body is relatively healthy in spite of the fact I have not done a particularly good job taking care of it. To be honest, I don’t think its all that aesthetically pleasing but a) most of the time, the aesthetics don’t bother me enough to do much about them, and b) I appreciate that from a functionality and aesthetics perspective, it could be considerably worse.

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      1. “Public bathing” might be slightly the wrong word. Think group shower (multiple shower heads, no stall dividers) in a women’s locker room where you were expected get naked, shower, and then you could put on your swimsuit before going into the hot springs which were co-ed. “Women’s locker room” doesn’t sound that bad, and no one is really staring at you per se, but showering in full view of other people definitely felt different from a normal gym locker room where you might show some skin for a second while changing. In any case, I consider myself grateful for, but not overly positive about or confident in my body, and I survived the experience (and actually, I did it more than once).

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  6. It can get very complicated. I was super heavy before my Mom passed , and then just lost alot . Some of it was due to eating less due to sadness , some of it from working out alot due to boredom . Not sure when I was the most happy but probably when I can wear my clothes the best and I saw my Dad in Mexico last . I do want to work out some to tone things and to get some muscle though.

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    1. Thanks for sharing that Krystle (Krystal? I don’t know why I can never remember the spelling). Anywho, yes. I think mourning can cause us to kind of let everything go or hyper-fixate on things. I hope we can all just get to a place where it’s not a thing at all.

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  7. “When is the last time you felt good about your body?” 5 minutes ago 🕺 but…. 6 minutes ago probably not.. It depends on whether I’m FOCUSING on MOVEMENT versus static vanity. And btw I LOVE love love everything about this post Dr. G. Questions are the cornerstone of my work as a (retired) psychologist. Getting below the surface is EVERYTHING. Only then do changes become transformational, personal, and eternal. Sending your heart, soul, and body a double dose of unconditional LOVE 💜💜

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    1. This is real, right? How we feel is really fleeting, just like most emotions. Thanks for this, Dr. D! I have a post swirling around in my head that begins with that gut convo we had last year 😉

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  8. That is a loaded question. One I will definitely have to put in my toolbox. Everyday, I try to find one thing that develops a deeper love for myself than was present the day before. In direct response it would be a time right after I left the Navy. Even though as I right this, I realize how much more healthy and strong I am now. Thank you for sharing! This one really made me think!

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  9. Thank you for sharing!!… I actually feel pretty good about my ole body… it has helped me through many of life’s challenges and adventures over time… we have some issues from time to time and I haven’t been kind to the body at times in history’s past ( when I were 20 years old and thought I was 9 foot tall and bullet proof), but all in all , following the hearts lead, we have, and still do, make a pretty good team… 🙂

    Until we meet again…
    May your day be touched
    by a bit of Irish luck,
    Brightened by a song
    in your heart,
    And warmed by the smiles
    of people you love.
    (Irish Saying)

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    1. Thanks for sharing, Dutch! I think we all think we’re 9 feet tall and bulletproof at 20 lol Then, we get older and find out we’re a bit shorter and should honor our bodies a little more, I suppose.

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  10. I feel this in my bones. I was always a bigger person (6’1” as I stand now) and my obsession with becoming smaller and less ‘stand-outy’ was intense. Ever hear the comment “I wish I was as fat as I THOUGHT I was in high school!” But had crippling anxiety over losing weight—running 6+ miles a day, sometimes 2x a day and barely eating. Yup. That’s me.

    Then while I was doing hardcore keto, I lost so much weight (hello 190 club for a 6’1” woman!) I was so proud to share my body on social media….but i was missing out on life and good food. I also carried over some terrible starvation tactics from my high school
    Days. I looked beautiful in my wedding dress though—a size 10/12.

    Fast forward to today, size 16/18 and although I have some work to do, I am also struggling with the fact that I, myself, can’t remember when I was truly happy with my body.

    I’m with ya sister. So glad some of the body image issues we face are coming to light.

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    1. You literally tried to shrink yourself? Thank you for sharing your journey here. It’s important, so we are not facing these things alone or continuing to stifle them so much that we don’t even know the answers or don’t want to think about the answers.

      Sending you some light, love, and peace. I’m sure your body is just fine 😉

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  11. I can’t remember a time where I felt good about my body and I’m only 29. Goodness. this is the first time I have ever typed that sentence. It is so hard to feel good about anything when I’ve spent my entire life, up until about 2 years ago, being bullied and picked at by everyone around me. I have developed an ” I don’t care” attitude about my body and my overall appearance.

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    1. Aww Catherine ❤ Sending you a virtual hug, my dear. I don't often give unsolicited advice, but I do hope that you pull yourself out of the "don't care" attitude to know and understand that you're important and deserve to be respected, even if it's just yourself respecting yourself 😉

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  12. Thank you for sharing such a personal post. I hope your relationship with your body conitnues to grow in a positive way. Not easy. I wonder why we tend to have strong feelings about our bodies and prefer one version of it to the other.

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    1. You’re welcome, and thank you for these kind words. I’m pretty sure it’s society. I was listening to a podcast the other day, and he talked about how ridiculous it is that we tie ourselves to our bodies anyway. He said it’s like putting on clothes and then being emotional because your clothes look a certain way, as if they represent you, when they don’t.

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  13. I’ve rarely felt good about my body, to be honest. As a child, I liked to eat, and my sisters always teased me about being fat. It was a real revelation to look at photos of me as a kid and realize I wasn’t actually fat at all. As an adult, I carried too much weight on my hips and thighs, and was always self-conscious about that. Then when I hit fifty I lost 15 pounds and finally felt I was at a healthy weight. Still, being on good terms with my body is hard, especially now that the aches and pains of being in my sixties are kicking in. I’m not so worried about what I look like now, but I admit I’d like to feel better!

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    1. Thanks for this honesty, Ann. I understand liking to eat. I used to like to eat. I still like to eat. Food is delicious. It’s funny, too, how being teased about being so-called fat can affect you/us. It’s like other people’s opinions weigh heavier than actual reality!

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  14. Thought-provoking post, Kathy. Let me join you in staring in the mirror and saying some affirmations to myself. 🙂 Because weight gain in the past two years due to a sports injury and menopause is so difficult to reconcile with. So yeah, lots of work to do, all round.

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  15. I felt great about my body six years ago, and one of the reasons I started my blog was that I wasn’t feeling good about my body at all.. menopause and weight gain and my body just slowing down….it’s all in my blog title. I just don’t like that walking can hurt my knees, that I get stomach cramps…bleh bleh bleh. And did I mention bloating and weight gain?

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  16. Based on my posts, this make come as a shock. Well, maybe not a shock, but startling nonetheless. I am always self conscious about my body. Especially if I’m going to the dermatologist. In the past year or so, I’ve come to terms with it, but I still try and work out.

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  17. I don’t think I’ve ever really felt good about my body. I just wanted to comment though and inject my two senses. Some how as a society we have decided that fat automatically means ugly. Fat isn’t ugly fat is fat. It means you have an excess in body weight. You can still be fat and beautiful, you can still be fat and have self confidence. I don’t think you meant anything negative by that, I just have been struggling myself to learn this

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    1. I’m sorry to hear you’ve never felt good about your body. I think we all should at some point, and I hope you will.

      I also agree about the “ugly” connotation, and I’ll add that the way my grandmother said it to me, stressing the word fat, made it seem equal to ugly. I think many of us are taught this (through media, society, and family), and it’s important to unlearn.

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  18. I read your blog and realized you could be writing about me. I have always had a love/hate relationship with my body. I have starved myself mostly to maintain a certain weight. I actually have issues eating. I will have one day where I eat all day long. And then the rest of the week I am eating tiny meals or nothing at all until supper. I am going to go and cry now because until I started to write this response I did not realize what I was doing. You love to get me thinking. BTW I am still working on that post. It has been percolating for awhile now and I think I have the right comedic spin to it. I will let you know when I have the draft ready. 🙂

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    1. Awww sending you a big virtual hug Jay-lyn ❤ I think now is the time to get a handle on these types of issues as a way to take ownership of ourselves, you know?

      Always looking forward to your drafts!

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  19. Sorry I had to laugh again! Your frankness is always disarming.
    What can I say? Aging is a special time like no other in one’s life, offering many “unexpected” experiences.
    Once there was a commonly excepted concept called “aging gracefully”, but then the “sinister wise men” of the pharmaceutical industry discovered how to dictate us to adhere to certain standards of appearance. Of course, the heaviest of the burden fell onto women! Having still applied themselves to the age-old beauty myth, no matter how far we have progressed consciously or intellectually.
    The solution? I guess it comes down to everyone’s individual choice how to age gracefully and carry proudly the battle scars our previous encounters with life had left behind.

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    1. I’ll take that as a compliment, McHapus! I think most people are not use to a bit of authenticity 😉

      right. Right. RIGHT. No matter how far we have progressed…I honestly think we haven’t progressed in this area very much. We’ve just shifted some things. I can’t wait to see how some millennials, who seem to want to stay young forever in many ways, fare during their midlife days.

      Of course, I agree with you in the end. It’s about acceptance and flowing with life. It’s just easier said than done sometimes.

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  20. This made me feel good, I think you maybe knowing that teens are really conscious about their bodies and unfortunately I’m too! So I’ll share it with many more of my friends so they don’t feel bad about themselves.
    Also, it’s really been a while since we’ve talked or I’ve read your blogs! I posted and you just liked it 🙌🏻 && I completed 1 year in blogging! Go check out that post too!
    And I just love how you write!
    Byee

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    1. Khushi! Where have you been bestie? I thought maybe school had you busy 😉

      And yes…I’m pretty sure everyone of every age is insecure about something on their body. It’s just a matter of admitting it, and possibly, accepting those so-called flaws.

      Thank you for the compliment ❤

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      1. Yeah I was stuck in middle of exams & got away from your amazing blogs😁
        I loved talking to you after soo long and yeah you’re absolutely right!!
        And please read my 1 year blog and thinking about that also I realised that this 1 year in blogging gave me a friend!!
        It was destiny I guess 😅
        Have great day💕

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  21. Your blog post hit me hard, Katherin. It’s taken me all day to gather my words to write a coherent comment. I related to every line you wrote. I also had a C-section and my body wasn’t the same afterwards. I have suffered through terrible rashes, a reflux cough and dry eyes.
    My insight about all of this is that my body issues really don’t have anything to do with my appearance. Yes, I remember the joy I used to feel after losing a lot of weight. But my own personal struggle is all about discomfort. Living with my annoying dry eye condition has really humbled me. And more recently, dental work 2 years ago has left me with all kinds of issues. They might be minor to anyone else, but my teeth don’t feel the same and it bothers me almost all the time. So between that and my eyes, your words made me cry!
    Honestly, I feel that I want to focus much more on my blessings than those irritants. But acknowledging them is important and I thank you for pulling these words from me!

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    1. Sending you a virtual hug Judy ❤

      What I've had to learn is that it doesn't matter what other people say about these things (e.g., "it's not that bad," "it could be worse"). Not to say it's okay to sit and wallow in it, but I think it's definitely okay to acknowledge them and then unlearn all those negative body image comments swirling around in our heads (whether it's cosmetic or just annoying, like your and my dry eye).

      I hope this makes sense. I'm glad you left this comment. It's not only helped me feel less crazy, but also helped me to add another strategy to my list…acknowledge and let go 😉

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      1. Ahhh – I love your response, Katherin. I’m touched to offer any strategy. It’s a work in progress for me. I am constantly acknowledging my frustration and letting it go. Otherwise, I would go crazy!
        I still hold out hope that things will improve. I’m having an eyebrow lift (called eyebrow pexy) in 2 weeks. It could cause my eyes to be drier, but I also feel such fatigue with my skin hanging over my eye. I am hoping this will literally be an eye opener! I’ll keep you posted. (This was approved as a medical procedure, not cosmetic – so it won’t cost me anything!).

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  22. For me I was thin at ages 1-7, 11, 14 Chunky the years in between, a slight gut and moobs from ages 15-21, then just kept getting heavier as the years went on my heaviest at 32, then I lost some weight and have hovered around 330 ever since, til I sick with Covid and dropped to 298..back hovering 😕

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  23. It’s amazing what can be revealed by just one question – yes very true, that question you shared is a very good one to make most of us very thoughtful about ourselves and our life. I think I am in general very happy and grateful in my body and also have had nagging thoughts forever about thinning hair. I am very much bothered by relatives who tend to comment and interact primarily about body appearances and not tend to acknowledge the person as much with a deeper regard for their being – and such relatives are everywhere.

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    1. “and such relatives are everywhere…” yes, yes, they are :-/ Maybe, we can start with those closest to us, and then it will filter out into society! Maybe.

      Thank you for sharing, Pragalbha ❤

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  24. This is so true and so painful. A lot of really smart woman have bought the tale that our appearance establishes our worth. The time, energy and pleasure we waste berating the way we are and are meant to be. Such aa waste…

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  25. Ohh dearest goddess, I feel for you! 🥺 I always feel pretty good about my body, and I def don’t have that perfect body (does anyone?) I have cellulite and very little muscle mass (ha!), pasty skin, stretch marks, and wrinkles. But I also think I’m beautiful when I look in the mirror. I think not looking in the mirror very often is actually helpful, because it keeps you from obsessing. I think honestly, looking at pictures of real women in the media is very helpful bc it takes away that stigma of how we’re supposed to look. Check out AndBloom, she takes photos of real women for a living. And I do think learning to buy clothes for your body helps. A poorly fitting garment can CONVINCE u that your body is gross, even if it’s not you, it’s the shitty-made garment. That’s what I can think of off the top of my head for now. And it’s also a lot of inner love too. Acceptance and forgiveness of yourself. You’re way more beautiful than you know! Sending u love!! xoxo

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    1. Thank you, my dear! I think acceptance is a huge part of this process. I’m going to check out AndBloom. She sounds like she does what I’ve been taking up on the other blog. I super sick of seeing “famous” people look a certain way, and I know it damages our own self-esteem.

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      1. Yes agreed! I hate to judge skinny ladies but at the same time, I’m super, super tired of seeing that bony, muscular, little person with big boobs. They allll look the same and I can’t imagine they’re eating very much. And it’s just not real. I LOVE when more real-looking women are portrayed in the media bc it is just retraining us all to see differently. And the older I get, also the less I care. I know my body isn’t great but it’s like, eh, what can I do?! I love cake too much ha! Lemme know what u think of AndBloom 💕

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  26. Interesting blog. And so true for so many of us women no matter what our age is. Sadly I realized in the last two years that I had to be almost dying in order to like my body again. I got so thin during cancer treatment that the oncologist had me on special protein drinks to keep weight on. I remember thinking I looked like death. And yet, it took that to look as super thin as what is considered celebrity attractive.. That puts reality to the test as to how messed up American women are when it comes to our bodies. When I stopped vomiting and could eat again I gained weight back and that added to the pandemic had me start to pack on the pounds. I realized how ridiculous we are about body image. We can’t get it right! So It’s best to not stress and just like who we are. Thin, chubby, or anywhere in between.

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    1. Thank you, Lesley ❤

      And thank you for sharing about how cancer and chemo affected you in this way. I totally agree that we shouldn't stress about it. I guess what concerned me is I actually was not feeling great about my body, but hadn't realized it. As I write this, I suppose it was just one of those feelings I'd suppressed.

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  27. Thanks for this post! I feel very good about my body, but I think to a large extent it’s because I’ve had good luck: no one ever criticized my body or caused me to diet as a teen, and my health has been excellent. I have control over none of those.
    I’m 57. To what extent is “feeling good about my body” because of things I have control over? Well, I lift weights, ride my bike, and walk with weights in a backpack (not all 3 in the same week; I’m not a maniac about it), and the fitness from those things is not extraordinary but makes me feel really good physically. I love the agility it gives me. I love to feel my heart and lungs working the way they are supposed to and I love to feel my strong leg and hip muscles propelling me. Now if I had a long-term injury or had to have cancer treatment, what would it take for me to feel good about my body — would I feel I’d lost my identity — do I believe need this fit healthy body to be who I am? Honestly I don’t know.

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    1. You’re welcome ❤

      I think no criticism is a huge part of loving your body the way it is, no matter what. Outward criticism tends to turn to inward criticism, I'm sure.

      I also like that you mention other things that are actually making your body work. I work out consistently, but never really thank or appreciate my body for operating (as it should be) to help me physically move around.

      And yes…what you've mentioned at the end is right. Our bodies are tied to our identities. If you lost a leg or something (knock on wood), you may feel a bit betrayed.

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  28. Yeah, women struggle with body image. I used to, but not anymore. Whether I lose weight or gain, I still feel good about my body. Why? 1– Surviving cancer (surgery, chemo, radiation) makes me glad to be alive. What my body looks like doesn’t matter much. 2– My husband tells me I am beautiful every day! I really love that man!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. It sounds like surviving a terminal illness helps you to gain some perspective. Lesley also mentioned that, and I can see how it would.

      And awww ❤ thank goodness for kind words from husbands 😉

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    1. Thank you, Kotrish ❤

      I mean…three months isn't too bad…don't let it be 30 years lol

      I think it's good that you know what to do to realign and get back to what's important to you, physically.

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  29. I hadn’t liked my body or myself for most of my life. When I was a skinny tomboy I was criticized for not being a real girl, I was often mistaken for a boy! I received a lot of criticism from my mother about everything about me, and later received criticism from the people in the two churches I had attended.

    I had internalized all the negativity and the criticism and so became UNABLE to think or to speak kindly of myself. The anxiety and the depression became a dreaded part of my life.

    Until I decided that I didn’t want to live that way anymore! I learned about thoughts creating Neutral Pathways in our brains and realized that changing my thoughts simply meant choosing new ones!

    However that was much harder to do than it sounds! When I started saying kind and gentle things to myself they didn’t sound true, they felt strange and alien to me.

    I realized that I had normalized all the negativity and had internalized it so deeply. So I persevered. I kept doing this as a strange kind of experiment to see if the science could help me!

    In spite of my inner resistance, I was able to gradually wear away at the negative thoughts by overlaying positive ones. Over time I came to see that the positive words I spoke to myself were true and I was gradually able to let go of the old lies I had come to believe!

    Today I can say I really like myself and I love all I have done for myself! I can honestly look at my body and smile at it instead of grimacing! I can thank my body for being there for me, through thick and thin! Do I wish to be a couple sizes smaller? Honestly, yes it’s still a thought! However the difference now is that I don’t call myself ugly names and tear myself down! Now I feel comfortable with looking in the mirror and complimenting myself for working hard to take care of myself!

    No matter what messages we received and internalized, we all can claim the power to change our inner narrative!

    Oh my, I just had an epiphany! I’ve been working on a new book for a few years. It started out with the intention of being a how to lose weight after 55, and has morphed into a more body positive messaging. I know I need to write it as a guide for claiming our inner narrative!

    Thank you for being the promo for this realization! 😻🌸

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Wow. Thank you, Tamara for all of this. I appreciate it. Before I forget, I think you should write something for my other blog (Navigating the Change) about body positivity after a certain age. Email me (kayg523@yahoo.com) so we can talk about it.

      Okay, so thank you, again for adding about neural pathways. This is part of the work I had to do to develop self worth, so I know it works, but hadn’t thought about it in terms of body positivity. This makes sense.

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      1. My pleasure! Yes, it’s all connected isn’t it?!

        I’d be honored to write for your other blog! I’ll email you!

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  30. Great post, and thank you for sharing your vulnerable insight. It’s wild how much one relatives’ unkind comment can shatter our self-worth, in the example of what your grandmother said to you before your wedding. That’s why the phrase “sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me” is false unless we’re talking about a robot. I will use your questions to do some soul-searching today… 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Thank you and you’re welcome ❤ I never liked that phrase, mainly because I knew it wasn't true. You're right. Unless you're a robot or a Buddhist, words hurt. I hope you find an epiphany somewhere along the way as you soul search ❤

      Liked by 4 people

  31. “When is the last time you felt good about your body?”

    I think I may have been about 22 or so. I am 41 now. I was in still in college, a size 6, and had just the right amount of curves as you dated, “in all the right spaces.” I felt attractive and beautiful and well-proportioned. I carried my weight well and my body felt like my own.

    “If you already feel good about your body, how do you maintain that feeling?”

    I’m trying to get to this place just as you are. It’s hard–it’s damn hard, but I am trying. I love so many things about my body but to be totally in love with it and content with it has not happened again, not yet.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. No worries on the question, Laura. I recently found out it could possibly be due to exposure to covid 😳

      For a long time, no doctor knew what it was. Dermatologist did a biopsy and named it. Recently, the naturopath said it could be covid related. When I looked it up again, sure enough it was on the list.

      Liked by 3 people

  32. What an incredibly honest post. Really makes you think! For me, between aging and grieving, when I say I really don’t give a damn, I really don’t! I am what I am. It is what it is and nothing more or less. Thank you for a great post. 🤍

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Oh my goodness – you delved into some sacred territory with this one. Amen – to all you’ve said! I’ve had two c-sections in the last 7 years, am struggling with thyroid issues, I seem not to have any flexibility any more, the weight gain and hot flashes of menopause. Ack!!

    On one hand, I’m so incredibly proud of my body for getting up every day. On the other, it doesn’t feel like my body and I can’t tell whether to talk to my head, heart or body about the issue.

    I am so confused on the issue that I have nothing else to say except I hear you!

    Liked by 5 people

    1. C-sections are the WORST! Anywho, yes. I had to go there. It kept bothering me that I really didn’t have a ready answer for the doc.

      “It doesn’t feel like my body” is exactly right, and you don’t know which part to send some positive vibes to…I KNOW!!! lol

      Also, I just had a thyroid blood panel done, so we’ll see what that reveals.

      I’m glad you get it 😉

      Liked by 4 people

  34. Madam ! I feel ineligible to comment on this subject . But if you consider me as your brother , I’ll take a few seconds to answer to the question you raised in your blog . If You ask me to tell my answer . It is : you are mentally fit , that’s why quite fit otherwise . I have seen man above century , fit and more fit than we all . Do meditation earliest in the morning . Not only you but people will feel you have born again quite fit and fit . Do Yoga if you get time . Every thing would be alright . Thanking you .

    Liked by 6 people

      1. Nice to hear from you . It is not like that that meditation is solution to every problem . What I am telling is that : you should not have any problem in your entire life , that’s why—MEDITATION . Please read my new blog also : all about past events , dead people , forgotten places . I have tried to make them all alive through my words . Please judge, how much am l successful in doing so ?

        Liked by 1 person

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