Monday Notes: Empathy

Tupac had a song called “Brenda’s Got a Baby.” I remember when I first heard it. I was alone in my dorm room.

It starts like this:

I hear Brenda’s got a baby

But Brenda’s barely got a brain

A damn shame, the girl can hardly spell her name.

I don’t know if it was the soulful harmony that preceded these words or the actual rap, but I was captivated.

The song goes on to describe how she didn’t know her parents. One of them was a drug addict. But here’s the kicker. Her cousin became her boyfriend and she ended up pregnant! And guess what? Brenda was twelve.

I remember being glued to the black and white video. Tears streamed down my face and I hadn’t even gotten to the worse part. Brenda had her baby, threw it in the trash, and then became a prostitute.

What in the entire…

Anywho, it was too much. And I remember it all. I sat on the edge of my bed and cried as if I knew Brenda personally. Even though I didn’t know anyone remotely close to a “Brenda,” I remember feeling the pain of being a twelve-year-old, who was pregnant with her cousin’s baby. And then I felt the pain of being a baby thrown away in the trash.

That’s how I’ve been my whole life.

Some may say I’m an empath. I’ve never claimed it. But I do admit to being empathetic. It comes naturally.

It doesn’t matter if I know your backstory or not, I have the ability to listen to what you’ve told me, recognize, understand and share your thoughts and feelings.

My problem, until recently, has been realizing that not everyone has this ability, which coupled with my (sometimes) judgmental nature, caused problems.

For example, when my father died, my cousins wanted my stepmother to pick them up from the train station. It was remarkable to me that they would ask a recent widow to do something more equipped for a Lyft driver. I couldn’t wrap my brain around why they couldn’t put themselves in a grieving woman’s place and sense she may be a bit too sad to function normally.

I recognized it again when my goddaughter brought her godson, Mark to our house a couple years ago. We were decorating Christmas trees.

Mark bounced around helping each person with their ornaments. He danced when we turned on some music, and when we watched Frozen, he belted out a song as if he was Anna herself.

But when it was time to go, he shriveled up like a roly-poly pill bug and sulked around the house until it was time to go.

And I felt his sullenness.

Without my goddaughter telling me parts of his homelife, I sensed that wherever he was going, there was no joy. For some reason, he was crying on the inside. He was more than just disappointed because he’d had a good time at our home. His sadness held an untold story.

“I feel sorry for him,” I said out loud.

“You always feeling sorry for someone,” a friend of mine replied.

I couldn’t understand how she or any other adult who witnessed the same Mark I just did, didn’t feel similar. Aside from my goddaughter, why didn’t anyone else feel his sorrow?

But now I get it…kind of.

For some people, empathy is a learned behavior that can be developed by reading fiction or purposely practicing how to walk in others’ shoes. It’s a skill, like active listening.

I’m not sure where I’m going with this information, though. On the one hand, I understand we can’t all go around crying over music videos and lyrics. On the other hand, I do wish people were more empathetic. It seems more empathy might create better families and communities…somehow.

So, I’ll end with the above thought and let you decide. Will empathy weaken or strengthen us?

107 thoughts on “Monday Notes: Empathy

  1. Such an interesting view and you are giving me more to ponder about as I’ve also been told that I’m an empath. Finding that balance, like in everything else in life is so important, I cannot agree more. Thank you for a lovely post

    Like

  2. Sorry I’ve posting on like all your content , but I had to catch up .
    I do like how you theorize empathy is a learned trait , as so many others I see who post about empathy seem to think it’s psychic or supernatural trait . It’s not and I do wish some knew what real empathy is ,which is like you described . It really would help the world tremendously.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Most definitely ! It all boils down to treating everyone how you would like to be treated , and also caring about your fellow beings . It would be nice if those traits would spread and people could see everyone as their family . I mean empathy is the reason civilization and society formed.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Wow! You just opened another door for me when you talk about Tupac’s mindblowing song, Brenda’s Got A Baby. Yes I cried and still cry whenever I listen to this heartbreaking story of desperation, hopelessness, cruelty, naivety, loss, abuse, neglect, suffocation of a young person’s soul.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Also glad to see you’re still here at WordPress. I haven’t written on my blog for some time. It feels good to write today. I’m looking to get back into writing more and you are still an inspiration.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I used to think that I was a very empathetic person. I later realized that what I was doing (and not especially well) was imagining myself in their shoes and understanding my feelings in their situation, not actually understanding their feelings. Empathy is not an easy skill to master.

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      1. In a way, it wasn’t a bad first step. At a minimum, one needs to recognize that other people are wearing different shoes in the first place, but you never quite grow if you’re only recognizing things in terms of your own feelings.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I remember that song “Brenda’s Got A Baby.” I was 15 years old when it came out. In the song, right after Brenda threw her baby in the trash, the song goes “…she didn’t realize/ how much the little baby had her eyes…” I remember those particular lyrics striking me deeply. It’s like those lyrics are saying, if she had just taken a second to look at the baby a bit more closely, she would have seen herself in the baby’s face, and she’d have been much less likely to take such tragic action. But stopping and looking more closely at situations, before acting, is advice the entire world can benefit from.
    Great post! Keep it up. God bless.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That song is the best/worst! I think you’re right. She didn’t even take the time to fully examine that she’d given birth to a human being, much less someone who reflected herself back to her. In that moment, it would’ve been too painful anyway, so I definitely agree with your assessment.

      Thank you for this comment.

      Like

  6. Thank you for sharing!!.. empathy is just a part of you, knowing that you feel kindness towards others means you have a kind and loving heart, something this world needs a great deal of today… I suspect that Mark felt that kindness and love when he were at your house, the reason for his smiles and the sadness knowing he were leaving… “At the end of the day people may not remember what you said or did, but they will remember how you made them feel.” (Maya Angelou)… 🙂

    Until we meet again..
    May the dreams you hold dearest
    Be those which come true
    May the kindness you spread
    Keep returning to you
    (Irish Saying)

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Empathy is caring. I think we are all capable of having it, depending on the situation. In my case, as a person who suffers with depression, I have the ability to emphasize but I would not be able to handle feeling another’s pain or discomfort on a too deep level. When I was 21 I discovered a new word in the dictionary “weltschmertz”, it’s German for “world-weariness”. That is how I felt even then. I think it takes a strong person to be able to become so deeply in tune with tragedy or fear or sadness without breaking down themselves. To me, your ability is a gift that allows you to be able to help where no one else can.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for adding this Elva. It makes me think/believe there are varied levels of empathy. You can probably empathize, without (as you’ve indicated) physically feeling the pain.

      I think there’s a lot of weltschmertz going on right now 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Today, I found this on Facebook. It is posted by Rod Serling’s daughter: “Human beings must involve themselves in the anguish of other human beings. This, I submit to you, is not a political thesis at all. It is simply an expression of what I would hope might be ultimately a simple humanity for humanity’s sake.”
        ― Rod Serling
        AS I KNEW HIM: My Dad Rod Serling

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I thought I’d replied to this post, but I guess it was a different but also empathy-related post. Anyway, I am sharing this one, now. I think it raises good points that we all need to remember, early and often.
    Stay safe, Dr. G.,
    -little Shira D.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for writing on this topic, Dr. G.: I tend to shy away from it because I really don’t know how to handle it, but it needs to be brought up frequently, and it needs to be wrapped into our educational systems. It also fascinates me, but in a bit of a gut-bending way, so I guesss I also need to deal more with it.
        But I like just staying in my room and working on my writing. Going out, especially these days with nut case nitwits not wearing masks, is just so drainig.
        Stay safe

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I believe that empathy will strengthen us. Being empathetic doesn’t mean that you have to enable anyone….having the ability to understand, or try to understand someone other than yourself, or outside of your circle is defiantley can be the missing link between all people.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Being Empathetic is a needed emotion now ! It is one of the most required leadership quality too ! I agree with your content ! I also wrote about my tearjerking movies and books in my blog !
    Though it looks like we are weak when we cry for someone else , that is strength of a person , feeling for someone else ! Feel proud !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for this affirmation Lavanya ❤ I have a list of movies, too lol One time my youngest daughter and I went to see You, Before Me, and I was so embarrassed sitting there crying uncontrollably, but you're right. It's not weakness.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. You really have me thinking with this one, Katherin. I would say that I am a targeted Em-path. I actively seek others in grief to let them know I relate and understand what they’re going through. I really do feel their pain and remember mine well.
    For me, it gives me purpose and reminds me of the hands that held mine when I was suffering with grief. It doesn’t bring me down.
    In other areas, I’m not sure that I absorb other people’s pain. Most of the time, I feel like I’m on a roller coaster ride dealing with my 3 children and their emotions. Keeps me busy!!
    Great post, as always. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is beautiful Judy ❤ So, you're not "weakened" by feeling others' pain, instead it strengthens you because you know you're helping/supporting them through their grief?

      The children are a whole nother conversation lol

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Empathy can be hard at times- well, all the time when we allow it to. There are times when I don’t want to feel because I feel like it can consume me. Though, I tend to care too much. And I just read a book where a 12 year old girl who ran away from home had met this guy who was older than her father who got her hooked on drugs and sex. I allow it to get me so emotional…

    I strongly believe that when empathy is used where your energy won’t be drained, it can move mountains. It can be that voice for others who can’t find theirs or afraid to use it, and that shoulder when someone just need that good cry after telling their story. Though, one must be careful of the ones who will take advantage of someone’s good-nature and empathy because some people take that as a sign of weakness and it’s not.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Pam, I think that’s the key, right. It’s the overwhelming part. Those of us who are capable of letting our emotions overwhelm us have to find a balance within ourselves. So, I was thinking that for a long time, I just decided to block all feelings, but that causes you to be out-of-balance too, even in a chakra kind of way. Then, I decided I’m just going to show all feelings, but that’s not cool (or appropriate) either, sometimes. The balancing is the hard part lol

      And that book sounds like something I don’t need to read 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That is so true, Kathy, about finding a balance. And yes, sometimes the chakras can be thrown out of balance- the problem I have most of the times. Lol. But I understand completely what you’re saying.
        And that book, it was a multi-perspective book in first-person, and I mostly skipped through that older guy’s chapter(s) because I wanted to reached through the book and strangle him, or worse when he gave his POV.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Empathy is both a blessing and a curse. A blessing as it invites a deeper connection with others, and a curse when our own boundaries confuse it with responsibility. Another excellent and thought provoking post K.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Feeling empathy makes life harder for the person who has those feelings, but ultimately, I think it makes the world a kinder place. Personally, I feel sorry for anyone who is under attack, which usually puts me at odds with the rest of the world. But I think that being able to relate to someone else’s pain is a good thing because when we do that, we’re much less likely to go around hurting other people. We’ll never understand how others think, but we can sure understand how they feel, if we just try.

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Oh god, I used to be embarrassed by my empathy but now accept it for what it is. The other day I met the brother of the man who’d lived in my new house and passed away. He came by unexpectedly to give me keys and explain the operation of water pumps. I was so emotional about the his loss and the contrast of my joy and how it was linked to the end of what may have also been a source of joy for the previous owner. I actually cried. His wife wanted to run off but I felt the brother was getting a little emotional too. I forgot your question haha.

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  16. Great question. I agree with other commenter that on an individual level, it can be draining – though I wouldn’t be without it, is can feed my worry and it takes emotionally. We do need it as a society, though. It is odd when you encounter people seemingly without empathy. There are times when, without necessarily being needy, I have waited for someone to have a ‘human’ response, but it doesn’t come. A couple of (male as it happens – is that mere coincidence) past bosses have been like this – they talked a lot about the importance of out workplace, humanistic values, but did not apply them. They also appeared unaware of any hypocrisy.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for sharing this comment. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that so many men seem to lack empathy. I believe society (no matter the country) teaches men to not show emotion, which causes them to act on in different ways, Then, there are other people, in general, who just didn’t seem to learn how to feel for themselves, or anyone else.

      I’m hoping the world shifts a little bit.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I hope so too. That’s a generous, empathic perspective 🙂 It seems to me that nations that have dealt relatively well with Covid have had empathic, humanistic, and communicative leadership. There are lessons to be learned there.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Empathy can be exhausting. It’s the main reason I started pulling away from people years ago. It was hard enough feeling very little joy and so much sadness and depression from friends, coworkers and church members, but couple it with my own anger at people who were oblivious to, or chose not to acknowledge how others were hurting and I was a basket case. Self-care kicked it.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I can see how self-care can be a panacea for having too much empathy and watching others lack empathy. And being in so many groups, where empathy isn’t demonstrated? That’s frustrating. But…ummm…church members had a lot of sadness and depression?

      Like

  18. I am definitely an empath. At times, it’s unnerving, particularly when an individual hasn’t said a word, but I sense their pain so acutely that I have to fight back tears. It can be draining for me and frustrating for those to whom I’m explaining someone else’s attitudes or behaviors. And, of course, I have to be careful to not be sucked into someone’s else’s drama, particularly someone with narcissistic tendencies. Can you imagine–an empath and a narcissist? Whew!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. …a match made in trauma heaven lol but seriously…it’s extremely frustrating! For a long time, I thought it was just me, like am I the only one who can sense what’s going on here?

      The more I think about this, the more I’m wondering if my family of origin saw this but didn’t know what to do with it.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Oh I think our families knew they just didn’t understand. I was the odd one in my family. They loved me but I know they thought I was weird. They focused on my looks rather than my emotions or intellect because I think they thought I was just bizarre. Flighty, spacey, dramatic, weird. Nope. Just different from them.

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      2. I’m glad you read this comment because I almost copied/pasted and asked you. I agree. I mean, my family hyper focused on intelligence and my grandmother never allowed me to think I had something to do with my prettiness.

        I do think they knew i was different (I think you missed the year where I discussed my adoption and mental health), but just how much, I don’t think they knew. I think, more importantly, I always sensed I was different, but the past ten years or so have shown me it’s okay.

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  19. You either genuinely feel others hurt and pain or you don’t, empathy cannot be faked or should I rephrase as you can instantly tell when someone doesn’t really care how you are feeling………..I’m a terrible one for taking on other people’s pain and worry as my own.

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    1. I hear you. I used to say the same about teaching. I’d tell my students (who were soon-to-be teachers) that the moment they didn’t wanna teach, they should get out because students can tell when you don’t care, and no one needs that.

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      1. Isn’t that the truth. Our students can sense our joy in teaching, if we love our subject matter . I’d often cry reading poetry aloud in class. I wasn’t embarrassed. I’d explain..that good writing elicits emotion. And they understood when I was moved.

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  20. Great post. I am not surprised that you’ve been called an empath. Many people have said the same about me as well. And you are correct. I also spent a lifetime being constantly surprised when others seem so uncaring. I just assumed everyone felt like I did. My sister once said after reading one of my poems that she couldn’t I’ve an hour inside my head, let alone a lifetime stuck in there. I told her I can’t imagine life any other way.

    As a teacher of gifted education the scholars would say you have synesthesia. A blending of the senses. Like Beethoven and Mozart saw, heard and felt music. Van Gogh saw and felt motion and drew it. Society didn’t get his sensitivity and locked him up. But his painting starry night exhibits what has been captured by telescopes in the galaxy. Yet he saw it… felt it.

    I have it with words. I taste words and they have scent, I literally feel their emotions.

    Synesthesia means your senses are so heightened that of course you feel things more deeply. My guess is this is part of who you are.

    It wasn’t until I taught writing that I understood my ability. I used words on stage when I acted to bring forth clear concise imagery and could bring an audience to tears by my performance. I thought I was just a good actress. But when I taught vocabulary and brought it to life I realized it was more.

    You might be an empath. You probably have synesthesia…. either way you feel and experience things extremely deeply. Not everyone does. Many highly gifted have this skill. Or is it a curse ? It depends how you look at it. It can make life challenging because you pick up emotions all around you. But wouldn’t life be boring any other way?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Lesley ❤ So, you may not be surprised to know that I tested gifted when I was four and went to academically talented and gifted schools 1st through 11th grade. What you say here makes a lot of sense.

      Like you, I remembered watching a documentary about Michael Jackson and those around him described him similar to how you've described Beethoven and Mozart. And, like you, I can see/hear words. They just come to me. People ask about my process, but I'll disclose this here (and maybe begin being more truthful about this), how I write is how words form in my head; it's natural.

      lol I suppose if you let the ability get out of control, then it can be a curse. I think that's why (and other reasons) for so long, I just closed my heart to people…because it's way too painful to be feeling all of your own feels, plus someone else's unhealed trauma.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Oh yeah, I figured you were in gifted classes. Lol I can spot gifted people. Lol 36 years teaching gifted, my sons ( 16 years apart , from two different husbands, and both tested gifted. My grandchild tested gifted too. From preschool on their teachers picked up on it. Sensitivity is something that is definitely part of it. When those children are little they can even identify with inanimate objects. I’ll never forget when my youngest son wept when workers hauled off my broken dishwasher. He literally ran down the street after them sobbing for Mr. Dishwasher. The same thing when we upgraded our minivan. My husband thought he’d fool him by saying it was just upgraded but the same car. At four he wailed saying, “ NO, I can tell, he doesn’t smell the same. I can’t feel my friend any,ore. I can’t hear him.”
        That son is now 32 and a director in the film industry. He’s an extraordinary writer, musician, rather visionary. And still extremely sensitive. As a director he can read people clearly and reach them in ways others can’t.
        Some people just can

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      2. Oops hit send too soon… but some people can just feel life to the core. He’s been hurt in love multiple times. And told me he’s not sure he’ll ever get married. Working such long hours he’s afraid he can’t give his all to a family… I think his fear is hurting others…he couldn’t bare it.

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      3. Wooooow!

        And yes, teachers always know. I’ve had to stop myself from asking people if their kid needs services lol funny, but not so much to the parents.

        My daughters are the same way, especially my youngest.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. Empathy will definitely strengthen us, once everyone has it. Until then, those of us who feel the pain of another as though it were ourselves hurting, must, as you reminded me, Dr. G, use our voices and our blogs to help others feel, and grow together, I think. I hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Empathy was drilled into me from early childhood. If I hurt a playmate or called them a name, my mom would “scold” me by asking how I would feel if someone did that to me. In other words, she asked me to put myself in my playmate’s shoes. It’s OK to empathize with someone’s problems, but it is not up to you to “fix” them or their situation. Also important to realize is that some people use their sad situation as a means to elicit attention or sympathy–but they never actually do anything about it. It’s tiring. Like how psychotherapists must feel when patients go on and on about the same problems week after week. Side note, very rarely do movies or music make me cry, at least not the same way as a heart-to-heart, face-to-face with a person. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wonder if it’s generational (some of it). I was asked the same thing and I asked my children the same (sometimes).

      That part about not fixing it is so true. I wrote about the need to help a few months ago, and I had to learn that it’s a no-no to jump in and try to solve everyone’s problems, especially when they didn’t ask for help.

      I don’t even wanna get into people who visit the therapist each week and retell the same story. I could probably write an entire blog about that.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. I am a big believer in empathy. The world needs more of it. As a Canadian looking in on your political system I probably don’t have talking room, but it seems to me that your ex-president Trump was the poster child for someone who didn’t possess a single empathetic bone in his body. (We have his sort in Canada, too). His lack of empathy was practically malignant and he drew others to him that also were lacking in this. I don’t know if this lack or denial of empathy is a coping mechanism that allows one to do heartless and cruel things and still sleep at night or what it’s purpose is, but I don’t like it.
    I think empathy should be taught – if not in the home, then in school – call me a bleeding heart snowflake and I’ll wear the moniker with pride. We humans are not supposed to be independent; we are supposed to be interdependent. Empathy helps with that.

    Deb

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    1. Thank you Deb! You’ve touched on so much here, and I agree with it all. There was a school somewhere that included empathy in its curriculum. I’m sure those students (probably now adults) are much better people for it. I wish we all could teach empathy at home, though. I’m just not so sure we’re all equipped lol

      I’m not ignoring that part about Trump. I agree, but I’m tired of talking about him.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. Tribalism can only thrive when there’s a perceived other and a divide, right? If we can each put ourselves in someone else’s shoes to try to gain perspective, then we may soften up a bit.

      Like

  24. I definitely identify as an empathetic person. It can be draining at times, but this is who I am. Everyone doesn’t understand it, but I feel that it’s not for everyone to always understand. I truly enjoyed reading this. Crazy thing is, Tupac is my favorite artist and every time I hear that song, I feel the same way you did. I look forward to reading more of your blogs! ☺️

    Liked by 3 people

    1. That song is so brilliant and insane at the same time. What you mentioned about “not for everyone to always understand” made me pause. I think you’re right. In my background, I spent A LOT of time trying to get people to see my point of view, when it was quite unnecessary A LOT of times lol

      I’m glad this resonated with you and thanks for commenting ❤

      Like

  25. Empathy is a skill, or quality if you will, that helps us stay curious and put ourselves in the other persons shoes. Definitely a strengthening skill and absolutely possible to learn. I believe the world would be a much better place, if people either tapped into it more or made an effort to learn how to be empathic. Less assumptions, more compassion… if only 😉

    Liked by 4 people

    1. “that helps us stay curious” is right Patty. I think less empathetic people assume they know what a group of people or a person who is a part of a whole thinks, believes, and knows, without ever really thinking about it from that person’s perspective.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. This is such a great post. I can relate…I am also very empathetic. A few years ago, I spend weeks crying after reading an article about a teenage boy taking his life after being bullied. It’s heartbreaking. What’s worse is I sense that many are on the complete opposite end of the spectrum, with no sensitivity or empathy whatsoever. As others have mentioned, I think balance is key, but I also believe that a general shift towards more empathy would be a good thing for individuals and for the world.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Thank you ❤

      I think those of us who have an abundance of empathy see that there are a lot of people who seem to have a lack, or this is what I'm choosing to believe. I'll tell you why. I often think I've surrounded myself with some of the most un/non-empathetic people I've ever known. It's almost like feeling emotion is a challenge. Therefore, I've come to the conclusion I just shared lol It has to be because we have so much that it just highlights a contrast.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Empathy is important, but coupled with action, we have an awesome combination. For those who are empaths, they often get stuck there. Those who aren’t should seek to understand and seek to support if necessary…just my two cents.❤️

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Michellle! How are you? I’m going to be reaching out to you soon with an idea.

      Until then, thank you for adding this part about action. I agree. Empathy is more than just feeling an emotion, it’s also acting on that emotion in some way, even if it’s just saying, “hey are you okay?”

      Liked by 2 people

  28. Empathy connects us so it’s a strength in my opinion. As you said, it’s a learned behavior that not everyone is willing to invest in, unfortunately. I have faith that storytelling, especially through an art form like music, can change that.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Hey MM! Thank you for adding this. I do agree that the arts (which there’s not always enough of) is a great way to develop empathy. We get to experience someone else’s perspective through their rendition of life ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  29. I think it is a strength that needs good balance. Being able to feel, understand, care, and respond are higher functioning skills and at the same time we have to balance them to function ourselves in this sometimes overwhelming world. (I really enjoyed your post and thoughts on this subject and I am glad the world has people, such as yourself) who feel. I think you probably made Mark’s experience all the better for being who you are). 💗

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Balance in everything is key, I suppose…or rather, I’m learning LaDonna lol We definitely cannot go around feeling all of the things…all of the time in this overstimulated world.

      I think you may be right about Mark. My goddaughter says he asks if she’s been to our house sometimes 😉

      Liked by 2 people

  30. I think we need a balance. We need to recognize that some people have had things happen in their lives that are difficult to cope with. And this includes everyone. Everyone has something. However, at a point, people have to learn to accept their life, but get on with it. Because everybody has something and we can’t all just sit and expect the works to cater to us because we have been hurt. We are just all hurt, affected in different ways…

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Balance is necessary, for sure. I once read a meme that said, “there’s an expiry date on when you can blame your parents for things” lol and I completely understood that sentiment. It kind of goes with what you’ve shared here. I do think, though, that maybe we could step outside of our selves for a second and share in someone else’s experience, as long as it doesn’t bring us down too much.

      Liked by 4 people

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